My first standalone ATmega328P/arduino breadboard

Having played with a Freetronics TwentyTen for a while I now want to build my own ATmega328P MCU powered devices running from batteries as cost affective as possible.

I followed this guide and ordered the parts for 2x solo units. I ordered the ATmega328P MCU etc from http://www.wiltronics.com.au.

willatmega328p

Maybe I should have ordered this one from freetronics. The label on the freetronics chip would be handy.

Freetronics_ATmega328P_with_bootloader_and_label_002_medium

This was the result of replicating the standalone arduino system on a breadboard.

The breadboard wire kit did not have a lot of red and black wires so please forgive the crazy colours. I did not have a momentary switch so I got creative with two vertical wires.

standalone_arduino_01a

One stumbling block was how do I program my arduino (as I did not have a stand alone programmer). I tried removing the existing chip from the Freetronics TwentyTen but it would not budge. I tried with more force but the chip would not budge. On closer inspection I could not see if the chip was soldered into the DIP socket (Googling did not say if it was or not). I considered de soldering the square style dip socket and replace it with a round style dip socket that uses less force. But luckily I decided to gently lever up the chip on both sides with a flat screwdriver and bingo, the chip popped out.

standalone_arduino_01b

Programming Considerations.

The chip that came in the Freetronics TwentyTen needs to be programmed as:

      • Board: Arduino Nano w/ATmega328
      • Programmer: AVR ISP

 

The ATmega328P MCU chip that came from Willtronics needs to be programmed as:

    • Board: Arduino Uno
    • Programmer: AVR ISP

 

The Result

standalone_arduino_01d

Where to Next

Moving from a large breadboard down to a permanent circuit soldered to a board and actually driving sensors etc.

standalone_arduino_01e